Cimabue

Cimabue.jpg
23x39.jpg
Cimabue.jpg
23x39.jpg

Cimabue

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Choice of 40" x 24" or 25.5" x 15.5" sized Paper Prints
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This is a bright and light board, and the mix of linear and curvature works nicely on Cimabue.  It has many of the most common events in the Christian faith, as well as some interesting others.  I experimented with this board including a greater number of the most common events in the faith than I usually place onto a board.  Consequently, this board offers a great amount to compare and contrast, and it is intriguing to note the way the different artists portrayed the same event.  

There is also a lot of movement in Cimabue.  Note the arcs and angles and the circular and rectangular framing in many of the images.  Some of the borders in these paintings and frescoes themselves are quite beautiful.  This was a nice piece to feature many of them.  

My friend and mentor Gracie remarked once how she liked when I included Scripture on the artboards I make, so I made a point to include some ages old verse in small, balanced places on this board.  

When I am finished with a board I get a feeling of whether I am pleased with the whole extent, not with whether an individual image is my favorite.  However, with this Cimabue board, I do find there is one image I gravitate to every time I look at it.  It is located along the left border in the middle where we see John supporting the grieving woman (I am guessing it is Mary, mother of Jesus).  John’s pain-lined face is turning away from the grief-filled scene and resolutely towards God the Father, featured to the upper right of the Cross.  

This scene reminds me that sometimes in desperation or sadness we look to the Lord to be comforted, and we are comforted.  And then there are other times we seek comfort and are instead given a Job to Do, and our comfort comes in slower time.  This scene expresses that to me.  Despite John’s grief and his whole world just being turned upside down, God’s response seems in this portrayal to be, “I’m filled with sadness too.  Now, we both need to get on with the work to be done.”  Comfort had to come in time.